Two Arrests in Case of Robbers Posing as Mormon Missionaries in Las Vegas

August 29, 2013

Two men have been arrested for a violent residential robbery this past June in Las Vegas. The suspects allegedly posed as Mormon missionaries in order to gain access to the home. They face several charges including kidnapping, conspiracy, and the Nevada crime of robbery with a deadly weapon.

Las Vegas Criminal Defense

The Nevada crime of robbery is the act of unlawfully taking another's property by force, violence, or threats. A classic example is "mugging," where a thief snatches a victim's purse on the street. Robbery is different from larceny from a person (pick-pocketing), which does not involve any use of force, violence, or threats.

Continue reading "Two Arrests in Case of Robbers Posing as Mormon Missionaries in Las Vegas" »

Tracking Device Guides Las Vegas Cops to Bank Robber

February 5, 2013

Last weekend Las Vegas police caught an alleged bank robber due to a tracking device that the bank teller had secretly placed among the stolen money.

The suspect initially tried to run away from the police and sustained a gunshot wound by a cop. The suspect faces several charges including attempted murder and the Nevada crime of burglary.

bank_robbery_arrest.jpgThe Nevada crime of burglary occurs when someone enters a building or vehicle with the intention to commit a felony, assault, larceny or battery inside.

A person may be convicted of burglary even if he/she did not "break and enter." A common defense to burglary charges is that the defendant had no intent to commit a crime inside the building or structure as he/she was entering it.

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Car Crash Leads to North Las Vegas Robbery Arrest

September 11, 2012

Yesterday morning four people reportedly robbed a convenience store in North Las Vegas. They then led police on a car chase, when ended in a crash into a vacant home. Three of the suspects escaped, and the fourth - a twenty-one-year-old male - was booked for the Nevada crime of robbery with a deadly weapon.

Las Vegas Robbery Arrest

The Nevada crime of robbery is the unlawful taking of personal property from the person of another (or in his/her presence) against his/her will, and the taking is done by force, violence, or threats. Typical examples are a gunman holding up a cashier in a store, or someone snatching a handbag from a woman on the street. Common defenses to this crime are lack of force or fear, or false identification.

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Man Pleads to Robbery in Foiled Bellagio Heist

August 1, 2012

Last week, a 24 year old man entered a guilty plea for the Nevada crime of robbery as well as conspiracy stemming from an attempt to steal chips from the Bellagio casino this past May. He and three men allegedly conspired to rob the casino of over $100,000 in chips, but Bellagio employees were able to intercept them. The man faces up to 21 years in prison.

The Nevada crime of robbery is the unlawful taking pf personal property from the person of another (or in that person's presence) against his/her will and by means of force, violence, or fear of injury. A common example is a thief mugging someone in the street or a gunman holding up a cashier in a store. Robbery is not the same as pick-pocketing (called "larceny from a person"), because pick-pocketing is done without the victim's present knowledge.

The Nevada crime of robbery is a category B felony in Las Vegas. The punishment includes two to 15 years in prison. But if the defendant used a weapon, then the judge may as much as double the penalty. Common defenses to this crime include mistaken identity or false allegations.

For more on this story, read: http://www.lvrj.com/news/man-pleads-guilty-in-bellagio-chip-robbery-164344956.html

To learn about jail information for people arrested in Nevada, watch our video:

Las Vegas Robbery Suspects Arrested in Las Vegas Hospital

January 31, 2012

Yesterday four people were arrested for allegedly committing the Nevada crime of robbery at a Las Vegas pawnshop. The suspects were apprehended after escaping to a hospital. At the pawnshop, the suspects reportedly took jewelry, guns and cash.

The Nevada crime of robbery occurs when someone uses force or threats to steal property from the person or presence of another. This is different from pick-pocketing (called "larceny from a person"), which doesn't require force or threats. Typical defenses to this crime include false allegations or mistaken identity.

The Nevada crime of robbery is a category B felony carrying two to fifteen years in Nevada State Prison. If the defendant had a deadly weapon, the judge may increase the sentence by as much as twenty years as long as the enhancement doesn't exceed the length of the original sentence. Double jeopardy law precludes defendants from being prosecuted for both robbery and battery in the same case unless the battery was completely unrelated to the robbery.

For more on this story go to: http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2012/jan/30/suspects-pawnshop-heist-arrested-las-vegas-hospita/

For information about Nevada jail information, watch our informational video:


Man Accused of Beating and Robbing Women is Jailed in Las Vegas

September 26, 2011

A 23-year-old man who allegedly assaulted and robbed women at the Suncoast and Red Rock Resort casinos was arrested and booked in jail. He reportedly confessed to the police and claimed that he was homeless and needed the victims' money for drugs. He faces charges for the Nevada crime of robbery and battery with substantial bodily harm.

The Nevada crime of robbery is the unlawful taking of personal property from the person of another by means of force or fear of injury. A typical example is a person pushing over a woman on the street and then snatching her pocketbook. This is different from the Nevada crime of larceny from a person, where no force or fear is necessary, such as with pick-pocketing.

Common defenses to charges for the Nevada crime of robbery include mistaken identity, false allegations or lack of force or fear. As a category B felony, robbery carries two-to-fifteen years in prison. The sentence may be increased if a deadly weapon was used.

For more on this story go to: http://www.lvrj.com/news/man-faces-charges-in-robberies-beatings-of-elderly-women-130448613.htm

For more information about Nevada jails watch our informational video:


Two People Convicted in Las Vegas Murder-Robbery Case

Last week a man and woman were found guilty for first degree murder, for violating Nevada robbery law, and for some other felonies in connection with a 2008 robbery plot that turned fatal. This week the jury is deciding whether to sentence the man to death. The woman may receive up to life in prison without parole.

Nevada robbery law makes it a crime to take personal property from another (or in their presence) by means of force or violence or fear of injury. The typical example is a thief pushing over a woman and snatching her purse. Typical defenses include no force or fear, mistaken identity, or lack of evidence.

Violating Nevada robbery law is a category B felony carrying two to fifteen years in prison. If a deadly weapon was used, the judge may enhance the sentence by up to twenty years as long as the enhancement is no larger than the original sentence. Double jeopardy prohibits someone from being convicted of both robbery and battery in the same case unless the battery and robbery were completely unrelated to each other.

For more on this story go to: http://www.lvrj.com/news/man-woman-found-guilty-in-robbery-plot-death-121421214.html

Two Robbery Suspects Arrested in Las Vegas after High-Speed Chase

April 29, 2011

Two days ago two men under suspicion of committing the Nevada crime of robbery were arrested following a high-speed chase. During the chase the passenger suspect shot several times at the officers. They were booked at Clark County Detention Center.

The Nevada crime of robbery is the unlawful taking of personal property from the person of another (or in their presence) against their will and by means of force or fear of injury. A typical example is holding up a store and stealing money from the register. Robbery is different from the Nevada crime of "larceny from a person," which doesn't require force or fear--an example is pick-pocketing.

Common defenses to a charge of the Nevada crime of robbery is lack of force or fear, mistaken identity, and false allegations. It's a category B felony, carrying two to fifteen years in prison. If a deadly weapon is used the sentence may be increased by up to twenty years (as long as the enhancement isn't longer than the original sentence).

For more on this story go to: http://www.lvrj.com/news/las-vegas-police-arrest-two-after-high-speed-chase-with-shots-fired-120776194.html

Co-Defendant in O.J. Simpson Case Agrees to Plea

December 27, 2010

Clarence Stewart, co-defendant in O.J. Simpson's Las Vegas robbery-kidnapping case, has agreed to a plea deal. Defense attorney Brent Bryson said, "I believe the district attorney and Mr. Stewart have reached an agreement as to the terms. The terms would include an amount of time still on house arrest, followed by a period of probation." Stewart was originally convicted and sentenced to 33 years in prison prior to his verdict being overturned and case set for retrial.

Nevada robbery law makes it unlawful to take personal property from the person of another or in their presence by means of force or fear of injury. A typical example of violating Nevada robbery law includes a thief pushing a woman on the street and grabbing her purse. Standard defenses include mistaken identity, false allegations, or that the defendant didn't use force or fear.

A violation of Nevada robbery law is a category B felony. A conviction carries two to fifteen years in prison. If a deadly weapon is used, the sentence may be as much as doubled.

For more on this story, go to: http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2010/dec/25/nv-oj-simpson-co-defendant-1st-ld-writethru/

Five Teens Arrested in Connection with North Las Vegas Robbery

November 17, 2010

Last week North Las Vegas police booked five teenagers (ranging from sixteen to seventeen) on suspicion of committing up to five counts of the Nevada crime of robbery. Some also face charges for possession of a stolen vehicle. Their names won't be disclosed because they are still juveniles.

The Nevada crime of robbery is the unlawful taking of another person's personal property in their presence by means of force or fear of injury. Examples include holding up a store or mugging someone. Typical defenses include lack of force or fear, mistaken identity and false allegations.

The Nevada crime of robbery is a category B felony. The typical sentence is two to fifteen years in prison, though the sentence may be enhanced if a deadly weapon is used. Double jeopardy forbids someone from being convicted of both robbery and battery in the same case (unless the battery was wholly unrelated to the theft).

For more on this story, go to: http://www.lvrj.com/news/north-las-vegas-police-arrest-five-teens-in-robbery-spree-107148948.html

Robbery Suspect in Critical Condition in Las Vegas

November 9, 2010

This weekend the Henderson police shot at a man suspected of committing the Nevada crime of robbery. None of the shots fired hit the suspect, though after the standoff he was taken to Sunrise Hospital for what seemed to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The police had originally stopped the man after the employees at a Check and Go store reported that they had been robbed.

The Nevada crime of robbery is the unlawful taking of property from the person of another (or in their presence) by means of force of fear of injury. Typical examples include holding up a store or mugging someone. Robbery is different than larceny from a person (commonly called pick-pocketing), which does not involve the use of force or fear of injury.

Common defenses to the Nevada crime of robbery include lack of force or fear, mistaken identity, and false allegations. As a category B felony, robbery carries two to fifteen years in prison. If a deadly weapon is used, the sentence may be increased.

Man Sentenced in Carson City for Pulling off Man's Pants

October 21, 2010

In Carson City District Court a twenty-one year old man was sentenced for battery with intent to commit the Nevada crime of robbery. He allegedly pulled off a man's pants to take the $400 out of his wallet. He received 28 to 96 months in prison

The Nevada crime of robbery is the unlawful taking of personal property from the person of another (or in their presence) by force, violence or fear of injury. Robbing (mugging) is different than larceny from a person (pick-pocketing) in that the latter requires no use of force or violence. Typical defenses include false allegations and mistaken identity.

The Nevada crime of robbery is a category B felony, carrying 2 to 15 years in prison. The judge may also enhance the sentence if a deadly weapon was used. Double jeopardy usually bars someone from being convicted of both robbery and battery in the same case.

Reno Police Shoot at Rock-Thrower

April 16, 2010

On Monday, Reno police tracked down a man in the downtown casino district that they believed had committed the Nevada crime of robbery. When they ordered the man to stop, he allegedly began hurling rocks and hit one of the officers. This prompted the police to shoot the suspect in the leg.

The alleged rock thrower was rushed to a hospital. He's expected to recover from the gunshot wound. Reno police spokesman Steve Frady said, "A rock can be a lethal weapon. Obviously both officers felt their lives were in danger."

The Nevada crime of robbery is the unlawful taking of personal property from the person of another by force of fear of injury. The Nevada crime of robbery is charged as a category B felony, carrying two to fifteen years in prison. Unlike burglary or home invasion, it doesn't involve the entering of a building or home.

Read more about this story at http://www.lvrj.com/news/reno-police-shoot-rock-thrower-in-leg-90817679.html.

Off-Duty Cop Shoots Suspected Robber in His Own Home in Henderson

March 16, 2010

On Sunday, two men allegedly broke into a home in Henderson with intent to rob it. Someone in the house called the police, prompting the men to take off. One was caught on the street, while the other attempted to hide in another house. But this house was owned by a police officer, who was home at the time, and he shot the suspect in the leg.

A neighbor later said, "It's always been a comfort. The neighborhood knows a policeman is in the neighborhood that takes an interest in our safety here." The two suspects, who are in their late thirties, are facing charges of kidnapping, robbery, and violating the Nevada crime of coercion. No one else was hurt in the incident.

The Nevada crime of coercion (NRS 207.190) makes it unlawful for someone, with the intent of compelling another person to act or not act in a way that person doesn’t have to, to use violence or threats on that person, his/her family or property. The Nevada crime of coercion is only misdemeanor where no physical force or immediate threat of physical force is used. But if it is, coercion is charged as a category B felony, carrying up to six years in prison and maybe a fine of up to $5,000.

Read more about this story at http://www.ktnv.com/Global/story.asp?S=12140598.

Reno Teens Face Stolen Property Charges as Adults

Mid-February, a Reno judge ordered a seventeen-year-old boy and a sixteen-year-old boy to face criminal charges as adults in relation to burglary incidents on December 10th, 2009. They were booked on counts of kidnapping, robbery with a deadly weapon on an elderly woman, burglary, grand larceny of a car, possession of a stolen vehicle, false imprisonment, and with committing the Nevada crime of possession of stolen property.

According to reports, the boys allegedly invaded a seventy-three-year-old woman’s home at 4 a.m. and stole her car, which the police spotted one of them driving later that day. After the arrest, the police linked the boys to a burglary earlier in the night, where a TV was taken. Police also claim they used guns stolen from past burglaries and that one of the boys struck the elderly woman with a rifle.

The Nevada crime of possession of stolen property makes it unlawful for someone to knowingly possess property that they know or should have known is stolen. If the value of the property is less than $250, it may be charged as a misdemeanor and carries up to six months in jail and/or up to a $1000 fine. If the value of the property ranges from $250 up to $2,500, it may be charged as a category C felony and carries a one to five year prison sentence and maybe a $10,000 fine. And for property valuing $2,500 or more, it’s a category B felony carrying one to ten years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. In addition, anyone convicted of the Nevada crime of possession of stolen property will be ordered to pay restitution.

Read more about this story here: http://www.rgj.com/article/20100212/NEWS18/100212031/1321/news

Las Vegas Homeless Man Beaten and Robbed

January 19, 2010

Las Vegas Police are looking for leads in the November assault on sixty-year-old homeless man Paul Schmidt. Police believe he was attempting to stop people from breaking Las Vegas graffiti law when the beating and robbery occurred. Schmidt remains in a coma at UMC.

The penalties for breaking Las Vegas graffiti law vary depending on the damage. If the damage is valued at less than $250, then it’s a misdemeanor, carrying up to six months in jail, 100 hours of community service and a $400 fine. If the damage ranges from $250 to up to $5000, then it’s a gross misdemeanor, carrying up to one year in jail, 200 hours of community service and between $750 and $1000 in fines. Beyond that, using graffiti in prohibited areas is chargeable as a class E felony, carrying up to four years in state prison.

Parents of minors convicted of breaking Las Vegas graffiti law are expected to pay any fines that the court impose or, in the alternative, perform community service. Furthermore, these minors may have their license suspended for six months to two years.

Two Arrested for Breaking Nevada Robbery Law in Mesquite

January 6, 2010

Last week two men allegedly entered the Virgin Valley Pawn Shop, pulled a gun and sprayed one of the employees in the face with pepper spray. A second employee managed to record the suspects' license plate number before they fled the scene. Police pursued the suspects, who crashed their car and escaped on foot before eventually being caught.

Both suspects have been charged with breaking Nevada robbery law with a deadly weapon, conspiracy to commit robbery with a deadly weapon, evading police and the possession of methamphetamine. One of the men was also charged with coercion with a deadly weapon. Chief Douglas Law expressed his relief that the situation ended without violence: “We were fortunate no one was injured, especially given the circumstances surrounding the armed robbery and pursuit; I want to commend everyone who worked as a team to safely apprehend the suspects.”

Nevada robbery law makes it a felony to take the personal property from the person of another in his presence, against the person's will, and by means of force or fear of injury. (Robbery is another word for mugging.) It carries two to fifteen years in prison, though the sentence may be doubled if a deadly weapon was used in pursuance of it.

Robbery Crimes Increase Around Las Vegas

January 1, 2010

According to the FBI, violent crimes and robberies decreased in Las Vegas during the first half of 2009 compared to the first half of 2008. However, violent crimes increased around Las Vegas. For examples, instances of people breaking Nevada robbery law jumped 29 points in Henderson, 25 points in North Las Vegas, and 15 points in Reno. And in Reno, aggravated assaults increased 20 percent.

Nevada robbery law is defined as the unlawful taking of personal property from someone else using force or fear of injury. It’s a category B felony, carrying two to fifteen years imprisonment. If a deadly weapon is used, the judge may increase the sentence for Nevada robbery law up to twenty years, but the added time may not exceed the underlying sentence.

Continue reading "Robbery Crimes Increase Around Las Vegas" »

Nevada Man Convicted of Killing Dad is Denied Pardon

November 19, 2009

Conan Pope, who killed his abusive dad when he was fifteen, appeared before the state Pardons Board in the hopes for a pardon that would allow him to join the military. Although he served six years for breaking Nevada voluntary manslaughter law, he hasn’t been able to get a decent job due to his criminal record. Although two Nevada Supreme Court justices took his side, the Board denied his request for a pardon.

Working against Pope’s favor are his past heroin abuse as well as the Board’s determination not to send a message that it’s okay for children to kill abusive parents. Deputy District Attorney Chris Owens said, "There are other youth out there with bad parents, but they don't shoot them.”

Nevada voluntary manslaughter law concerns homicides whereby the alleged killer was seriously and highly provoked to inflict injury (by being injured him/herself) or intended only to commit serious personal injury and not death. Nevada voluntary manslaughter law makes the crime a category B felony punishable by one to ten years in state prison and maybe a $10,000 fine.

Las Vegas Senior Citizen Shoots Home Invaders

November 16, 2009

On Thursday morning, an elderly man fended off several home invaders who kicked in the front door of his house near the intersection of Rancho and Vegas. After the intruders allegedly attacked the homeowner, he grabbed his gun and shot at them. One died and the rest fled the scene.

NRS 205.067 makes it a crime to forcibly enter an inhabited dwelling without permission of the owner or occupant. It makes no difference whether or not there is someone in the house at the time of the alleged invasion.

Anyone convicted of NRS 205.067 faced a category B felony, carrying one to ten years in state prison and maybe a $10,000 fine. If the suspect has previously been convicted of NRS 205.067 or burglary, they may not be granted a suspended sentence or released on probation. And if the suspect had in his/her possession a deadly weapon at the time, the sentence range is increased from two to fifteen years.

Man Jailed after Going Near Carson City Gang

August 28, 2009

Twenty-two year old Miguele Rubio, who was court-ordered to stay away from gangs, was taken into custody last week when law enforcement allegedly observed him near Carson City’s Lima Street Gang. Rubio is now in a Douglas County Jail awaiting his next court date.

Rubio was originally arrested in March along with Andrew Tagay, a gang member, for allegedly mugging two teens. He pled guilty to robbery in Nevada and was given a suspended sentence on the condition that he avoid all gang crimes in Nevada, including being near any gang members.

Gang crimes in Nevada are penalized harshly by the state courts, enhancing an underlying criminal sentence by one to twenty years.

NV Prisons Chief Aims to Stop Illegal Cell Phone Use

August 5, 2009

Even though it’s illegal to give cell phones to inmates, a significant number of Nevada prisoners still manage to procure and use cell phones. To help combat this issue, Nevada prison chief Howard Skolnik advocates using signal-jamming technology in prisons. Skolnik explained, "We don't always know what's inside our institutions, so the best way for us is, if these unauthorized cell phones get in, to make sure they aren't functional.”

Skolnik recounts how Kenneth “Jody” Thompson, who had been doing time at the Northern Nevada Correctional Center for grand larceny and robbery in Nevada, used a smuggled cell phone to orchestrate his escape in August 2005. Thompson then proceeded to commit robbery in Nevada several more times before being recaptured.

All non-governmental radio communications is subject to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules. Currently, FCC permits only federal agencies to jam cell phone signals, which excludes state prison systems.